Facebook, Maslow & the Psychology of Social Media

Facebook, Maslow & the Psychology of Social Media

A couple of years ago, Boston University released the results of a study into the psychological aspects of why people use Facebook. It looked at how Facebook specifically, but in a wider sense social media in general, fits into the context of human needs.

The research concluded that, in line with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, Facebook meets two human desires; those of belonging and self-presentation, both linked closely to self-esteem and self-worth. It hypothesised that there are differences in the way people use and share on Facebook according to cultural factors, and that there is an aspirational element to how we portray ourselves online.

Now, flip your mind from user to marketer if you’d be so kind.

What do you think, given what I’ve just described, should be the key characteristic of social communications professionals in 2014?

I’d like to suggest ‘empathy’. The capacity to understand why people follow your brand on Facebook or have tweeted you.

But when we talk about social media marketing we tend to talk in phrases like ‘reaching out’, ‘building relationships’ and ‘engaging in conversation’. Huh?! When was the last time, talking to friends on Facebook or Twitter you ‘reached out to build relationships by engaging them in conversation’?

At the end of the day, I’m ‘me’ and you’re ‘you’. If you believe Boston University, we all just want some recognition from that fact. People respond to people. And we respond to innate human characteristics like understanding, humour and compassion. We respond to others’ ability to put themselves in our shoes, to appreciate how we feel and to make us feel great about ourselves.

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